olive oil dush, tapioca, personal chef, personal chef austin, catering austin, meal delivery austin, customized meals austin

Olive Oil Dust

by Chef Wards

A few years ago, I started hosting Stone Cold Smooth Criminal Supper Clubs with a couple of my culinary friends. What began as a passion project quickly turned into a highly-coveted event. I don’t run them anymore, but our team is proud to bring it back for one night only on February 13th. (Tickets on sale now!)

This evening gives us the unique opportunity to share with you the innovative ideas we’ve been working on behind the scenes. We began by curating a menu featuring four of our Artisan’s favorite dishes from land and sea. Think: Butter Poached Lobster, Squid Ink Linguini, Grilled Waygu Loin, and Flour-less Chocolate Cake with homemade Stout Marshmallows. We then gave it our signature spin by showcasing elements of molecular gastronomy. Habanero Berry Yolk, anyone?

What is Molecular Gastronomy?

Bridging the gap between the science lab and the kitchen, molecular gastronomy brings a modern style of cooking to the table. It encourages chefs to explore the physical and chemical transformations of food, and allows us to pursue an even greater level of culinary creativity. The Austin Artisans have pulled out the Bunsen burners (okay, not literally) to study and implement these new techniques.

Want to give it a try? Molecular gastronomy is not only fun, but it’s also a great way to impress your friends. And if you lean in a little closer I’ll tell you a secret: it’s not all that hard to do. My Olive Oil Dust recipe is a simple place to start experimenting. I recommend using it in place of a finishing oil. The dust melts in your mouth and adds that umami component, just like extra virgin olive oil. The crowd will go wild!

Olive Oil Dust

All it takes

80 grams extra virgin olive oil
25 grams tapioca maltodextrin
Pinch of salt

Let’s Get Cooking

  1. Whisk oil, maltodextrin, and salt in a bowl until it begins to convert to a powder. For a fluffier texture, pass it through a tamis.
  2. Reserve in a sealed container.

Posted in: Entertaining Tips, Recipes